Rotorua

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Available now Limited availability on request Sold out
2 Bedroom Apartment

2 Bedroom Apartment

dishwasher full size fridge freezer full oven & cook top microwave waste disposal coffee plunger washing machine clothes dryer iron & ironing board Electronics TV SKY CD direct dial telephone dial up modem
   

Check availabilty of Rotorua apartments. Reset your dates in the red box.

  • Marama Resort

    1420 Hamurana Road, Northern Rotorua.
    Escape to this idyllic spot nestled between the Northern end of Lake Rotorua and Lake Rotoiti on the Ohau Channel, just 15 km from central Rotorua.
     
    Marama
     
  •   

Rotorua Sightseeing

  • Visit the Agrodome to see the famous sheep show and experience the many adventure activities (2 hours to half a day)

  • See the Buried Village, devastated by the eruption of Mt Tarawera in 1886 (2 hours)

  • Fish for trout in the local streams and lakes (half day or full day)

  • Take a 4WD trip up Mt Tarawera (half day)

  • Try a Maori hangi (feast) and enjoy a concert (3 hours)

  • Visit a geothermal area (half day)

  • Relax in a hot pool and try a spa treatment (half a day)

  • Go white water rafting (half a day)

  • Take a trip up the gondola and ride the luge (2 hours)

  • Go mountain biking amongst the giant redwoods (3 hours)

Drive Times

Wellington – Rotorua, 6.5 hours
Auckland – Rotorua, 3.5 hours
Taupo – Rotorua, 1 hour
Mt Maunganui – Rotorua, 1.2 hours

Population: 55,000

A showcase for Maori culture, this small city on the shores of Lake Rotorua has attracted visitors from around the world for over one hundred and fifty years.  Originally they came to take the therapeutic waters, but nowadays there are many adventure activities to enjoy.

History and Culture

It is said that a man named Ihenga discovered Rotorua.  One of those who travelled to New Zealand in the great Maori migration to these shores in the Arawa canoe, Ihenga was from what is now referred to as the Te Arawa tribe.  According to the legend, he was out looking for delicacies for his pregnant wife when one of his dogs disappeared into the bush in pursuit of a kiwi.  It later returned with a wet coat and “threw up” a meal of half digested fish.  Ihenga realised that he was near water, and searched until he discovered Lake Rotoiti and later Lake Rotorua.  The Te Arawa people moved inland and settled on the shores of these lakes.

Over the years there were numerous legends originating in the area, but one of the best known is the story of the young lovers, Hinemoa and Tutanekai.  The daughter of an influential chief, high born Hinemoa was both beautiful and graceful and many young warriors were keen to marry her.  However it was for her father and family to decide her suitor.  One day she looked into the eyes of young Tutanekai and immediately knew that he was the man for her.  He was low born and his family lived on the island of Mokoia in the centre of Lake Rotorua.  Tutanekai also fell in love with Hinemoa, but there was no way her family would agree the match.  So a long period of furtive looks and gestures followed and each night the lonely Tutanekai would play sad tunes on his flute.  The sound of the flute would carry across the lake to the village where Hinemoa lived, and she would sit on the lake front and listen to the mournful sound.  One night she decided she would take action, and tying water containers together for buoyancy, swam the long distance out to the island.  Arriving exhausted and cold, she went to the hot spring on the island to warm herself.  Tutanekai eventually went to the spring and found her there.  Elated he took her in his arms for the first time and they returned together to his whare (hut).  The next morning, realising what had happened, Hinemoa’s family arrived in their waka (canoes) and Tutanekai feared a battle.  However, the two families agreed that the match could be made and they all lived in harmony thereafter.  So sometimes the course of true love does run smoothly!

Rotorua’s reputation as a spa resort goes back more than 160 years when the famous Pink and White terraces were the major drawcard of the area.  These immense silica terraces (one distinctly pink, the other white) were considered to be one of the great wonders of the world.  Unfortunately they were lost to humanity when covered with ash and lava in the 1886 eruption of nearby Mt Tarawera.  Despite this, there was still an effort to create in Rotorua the “spa of the South Pacific” and at this time a large Tudor style bath house was constructed, which still stands today, serving as the very interesting Rotorua Museum.  The bath house employed the thermal spring water and mud, for a variety of bathing, mud and massage treatments.  Designed for recreational rather than therapeutic bathing the Art Deco styled Blue Baths were opened in 1931.  They closed 40 years later but were restored and reopened in 1999.  Today’s Polynesian Pools complex is built on the site of the Priest Springs.  These springs got their name from a Tauranga based Irish priest who dug a hole and set up camp next to the muddy pool, bathing daily in it for 3 months until he considered himself cured of arthritis.  The complex today is a far cry from these humble origins, with landscaped pools and sophisticated spa treatment rooms and staff.

 

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